Dipankar Dutta

Dipankar was born on 20 September 1960 in Jamshedpur, the son of Anil Kumar Dutta, also featured on this website. Dipankar completed his initial medical training in Calcutta, now Kolkata, but then wanted to complete a higher degree, so he applied to take an MD course in India, whilst also applying to undertake the PLAB test in England. He came to the UK in 1989, passed the test and returned to India to complete his higher degree, coming back to England again in 1991 with his wife. It took some time for both Dipankar and his wife to find jobs in the UK, but eventually he found short term posts for six months at a time, in Rotherham and then in Dewsbury, both in West Yorkshire. He worked in Grimsby and also in Bristol, and, having passed the MRCP exam, he found a Registrar post in Slough. Unlike many others who planned to return to their countries of birth and never did, Dipankar and his wife did go back. This was, in part, because of his father's health problems. Luckily his father's condition stabilised, and Dipankar stayed for 18 months, working in private medicine, but he missed working within the NHS. Both he and his wife found that the only opportunities to be found were in private medicine and they both missed the structure and organisation of working within established NHS hospitals. Though more structured now, at the time hospitals in India were more disorganised than in the UK so Dipankar eventually returned. He took a staff grade post in Dundee, Scotland, then a Specialist Registrar training rotation. He then moved around the country, working in Birmingham, Worcester, Kidderminster and Hereford, and finally got a post as Consultant in Gloucester. He remains in this post today as Consultant in Stroke Medicine.

Impact of policy for overseas born doctors

The Calman reforms set out more structured training for doctors in their career paths to consultancy. You have to get into a training programme and you're awarded a certificate of completion of specialist training at the end of five years and then you apply to be a consultant. So you had to get a national training number to join the rotation and to get that, your immigration status has to be such that you are no longer subject to regulation, that you have leave to remain in the UK basically. And that enables you to get the national number and then you get the job. If I'd been from the European Union, I would have been able to do as I like and stay as long as I like or work in any speciality.

Dipankar Dutta

India